clarification on case sensitivity of language tags

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clarification on case sensitivity of language tags

levrin
From what I understand, Zend always expects locales to be in a format like "en_US", with the language subtag lowercase and the region subtag uppercase; is this correct?

I find myself having to deal with TMX files produced by different programs, and to my great annoyance the official standards for language tags explicitly declare that language tags are case insensitive regardless of capitalization conventions, so I have inconsistent labelling. Is my best option to just write myself a script to standardize the tags?
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Re: clarification on case sensitivity of language tags

Thomas Weidner
Language tags are normalized when being read.
This means that "en-us" has to be accessed as "en_US" when working with
Zend_Translate as the string "en-us" is converted to the locale "en_US".

Greetings
Thomas Weidner, I18N Team Leader, Zend Framework
http://www.thomasweidner.com

----- Original Message -----
From: "levrin" <[hidden email]>
To: <[hidden email]>
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2009 9:24 PM
Subject: [fw-i18n] clarification on case sensitivity of language tags


>
>>From what I understand, Zend always expects locales to be in a format like
> "en_US", with the language subtag lowercase and the region subtag
> uppercase;
> is this correct?
>
> I find myself having to deal with TMX files produced by different
> programs,
> and to my great annoyance the official standards for language tags
> explicitly declare that language tags are case insensitive regardless of
> capitalization conventions, so I have inconsistent labelling. Is my best
> option to just write myself a script to standardize the tags?
> --
> View this message in context:
> http://n4.nabble.com/clarification-on-case-sensitivity-of-language-tags-tp991580p991580.html
> Sent from the Zend I18N/Locale mailing list archive at Nabble.com.